Blog

How WiFi is Transforming the Student Experience

Little boy using WiFi on a computer at school

The generation that has never lived life without the internet and easy access to a computer, Gen Z-ers grew up during the ultimate period of digital transformation. They’re now students and pupils and whether it’s school, college or university, WiFi has changed the game of education for them like no other generation has experienced.

From home-learning being more accessible than ever before to research being easy to do without even leaving their bed, education has been accelerated into overdrive with the handiness that is WiFi. 

It doesn’t just relate to learning either, but their mental health, their unique needs and ultimately their happiness. After all, they often spend the majority of their waking hours in the learning environment. 

Advantages of using technology in classrooms

Classroom technology

In today’s age, learning opportunities for students is forever increasing, whether it’s researching information online, or using the latest software programs and tools. Access to information is becoming easier and easier, thanks to classroom technology highly progressing forward.

Comparing to old traditional times and methods, classroom technology has really advanced making it easier when gaining information. Easily access technology at your fingertips, whether you need any programs, tools or receiving information, all can be done instantly and even when you’re away from the computer, smart phones and tablets are able to provide access on the go for students.

Born Free launches Great Debate schools initiative

Group of children ready for the great debate

International wildlife charity Born Free has today announced the launch of its new educational Great Debate initiative and is now calling out to schools across the UK to get involved.

Designed to provide teachers with the tools to engage their students in meaningful debates about key wildlife or environmental topics that will affect their future. Born Free’s Great Debate will not only allow students to gain knowledge about the debate topic, but also offer them skills that will help them to research, frame and deliver an argument while becoming responsible citizens, reducing their impact on biodiversity and the environment.

SEND pupils: ‘It’s crucial that we don’t make any child feel singled out’

SEND pupils at St Giles are boosted by the inclusive school ethos

St Giles’ C.E. Primary School is a mixed primary school with approximately 400 pupils in Walsall, West Midlands. The school has an above average number of SEND pupils and around a quarter of pupils speak English as a second language. Simrat Mavi, Deputy Headteacher at the school, talks us through their priorities for all pupils. 

A Guide to Monitoring Mental Health Within Education

Sad little girl with bad mental health

Article from Ellie Collier, High Speed Training

In recent years an increasing number of children have shown signs of suffering from mental health issues, with three children in every classroom reported to have a diagnosable mental health disorder according to a Young Minds charity report. As well as affecting a student’s emotional wellbeing, their educational attainment can also be negatively impacted if they’re struggling to cope with their current mental state. So, as exam season commences, it’s fundamental that those within the industry take extra care and precautions to ensure students thrive during this defining time of their lives. High Speed Training explains how to compile a thorough mental health policy document.

Options Trent Acres School – implementing a positive learning culture for students with SEN

Boy with SEN at Trent Acres School

Options Trent Acres, Kings Bromley, Staffordshire, a special independent school for boys and girls aged 8-18 with autism and a range of complex needs including mild learning disabilities, was recently declared ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted. Trent Acres, run by Options Autism,is part of Outcomes First Group. Here, headteacher Melanie Callaghan-Lewis discusses how staff have implemented a positive learning culture at the school. 

The dyslexia assessment: why I was in tears

Helene Cohen, who was found to have dyslexia at 54

Hélène Cohen from Please Miss is a former SENCO who now trains teachers and advises schools on their SEND provision. She also tutors for the NASCO and iSENCO Masters awards and the NPQ senior and middle leadership qualifications. Here, she discusses with Education for Everybody what happened after she made the decision to be tested for dyslexia  during her doctorate studies, as outlined in her previous blog for Education for Everybody…

The Assessment

Temprocket: Why the CCS framework could reduce teacher choice and quality

Temprocket's Andrew Johnston

The way the CCS framework has been applied could do schools (and agencies) more harm than good, says TempRocket Founder Andrew Johnston.

The Crown Commercial Service (CCS) helps to provide commercial services to the Public Sector and save money for the taxpayer by improving government commercial and procurement activity. The CCS framework has recently been applied to the education sector to make it cheaper and easier to recruit full-time teachers. 

Why marketers need greater neurodiversity

nerodiversity - a man points at a screen

by Mark Evans, Marketing Director, Direct Line Group

Despite contributing over £120bn to the UK economy, marketing is one of the most misunderstood industries amongst young people. As a result fewer people are considering becoming a marketer than ever before. According to research by Unidays, just 3% of students aged 18 to 24 believe marketing is a good career option, and only 2% believe it is the best career for long-term success. Marketing clearly needs to get better at marketing itself!