mental health

WIN an SENCO books package worth £99

SENCO books – making sense of dementia

Thanks to a range of leading health and education publishers, Education for Everybody has a package of books to give away which would be perfect for any SENCO or SEND teacher – worth a total of £99.

Making Sense of Dementia, Orchard Care Homes 

Orchard Care Homes, a leading provider of high-quality care for the elderly, has launched a new children’s activity book, ‘Making Sense of Dementia,’ designed to develop understanding and remove some of the fear and confusion associated with the condition.  

Using digital to help young people's mental health

Little girl with poor mental health
By Eleanor Bradley, Chief Operating Office at Nominet

The NHS has labelled the issue of addressing mental health among young people as ‘in crisis’, as the support available fails to keep pace with the alarming increase in demand for it. According to the Nuffield Trust, the number of 4-24 year olds reporting a longstanding mental health issue has increased six fold in the last 20 years.

What else has changed in the last 20 years? In less than a lifetime, digital devices and the internet have infiltrated every corner of our lives. Young people today are growing up in a digital world; their lives have been changed by it, for better or worse.

Why recognising the early signs of mental health issues in children is crucial

Parent and young daughter talking about recognising the early signs of mental health issues

Children and young people’s mental health has never been so high on the public agenda. Figures released recently show that 5% of children aged 5-10 have conduct disorder; this increases to 7% as young people approach secondary school years (Green et al.) and referrals to child mental health units from UK primary schools for pupils aged 11 and under have risen by nearly 50% in three years.

XenZone Launches New Online Mental Health Service for Barnet’s Teachers

Students using XenZone Online Mental Health Service

Teachers and School Staff Throughout Barnet to Benefit from Free Access to New Online Counselling and Emotional Wellbeing Service, Qwell

Barnet Council has commissioned XenZone’s online counselling service for adults, Qwell, to give free online mental health and wellbeing support to teachers and school staff in the area, having commissioned the organisation’s Kooth service for local children and young people in June 2018. 

The move signals XenZone’s drive to make accessible help available to specific user groups who stand to benefit from timely support, and the Council’s goal to support resilience in educational staff. Any member of school staff who is over the age of 18 can use Qwell for free online mental health and wellbeing support. 

Wellbeing in schools

Bernard Canetti on Wellbeing in schools

Wellbeing in schools: how can school leaders respond to the fact that one in eight students experience mental health issues?

Bernard Canetti, Principal of Brampton College, London’s highest achieving independent sixth form college gives his opinion on the government’s plan to dedicate an additional £31.6 million to the training of more educational psychologists and the need for a proactive holistic approach to wellbeing in schools...

With one in eight 5 to 19-year-olds experiencing at least one “mental health” disorder, according to results published last year by the NHS[1], I, along with many of my fellow teaching professionals, welcome the Government’s plan to dedicate an additional £31.6 million to the training of more educational psychologists[2]. 

Great Ormond Street Ambassador Launches New Play Therapy Service

Sad little girl at Play Therapy Service

Play therapist and Great Ormond Street ambassador Amanda Seyderhelm is launching a specialist play therapy service which will address the increasing needs of children struggling with issues related to loss and change. Based in the Lincolnshire town of Stamford, Amanda will focus on the requirements of children aged between seven and 10.

Teenagers Need to Escape their Own Minds Warns Expert

Expert watching teenagers taking an exam

As young people gear up toward putting time into their revision for next year’s mock exams - and then A-levels and GCSE’s, NLP and mindfulness expert, Peter Wright, warns that parents should be ensuring young people adopt a healthy attitude towards revision, and be encouraged to escape from the pressures put on them by the system and by themselves.

According to the Mental Health Foundation, 10% of children and young people (aged 5-16 years) have a clinically diagnosable mental problem, yet 70% of children and adolescents who experience mental health problems have not had appropriate interventions at a sufficiently early age. 

68% Increase in Incidence of Self-Harm Amongst 13-16 Year Old Girls

Teenage girl listening to music after participating in self-harm

According to a recent study in the British Medical Journal (BMJ)1, a 68% increase in self-harm incidence was found amongst girls aged 13-16 between 2011 and 2014 in the UK, with an annual incidence of 77 per 10,000 (or 0.77%) in that specific group of age. The study also highlights that self-harm is the strongest risk factor for subsequent suicide, with suicide being the second most common cause of death before age 25 worldwide. According to the authors, these revealing results indicate an “urgent need to develop and implement effective interventions for girls in their early-mid teens”. 

Child mental health diagnosis: the need to be trauma informed

Dr Margot Sunderland, Director of Education and Training at The Centre for Child Mental Health

Dr Margot Sunderland, Director of Education and Training at The Centre for Child Mental Health, writes about trauma and loss and how teachers and other agencies must be well-informed to ensure correct diagnoses…

 

Of course many diagnoses given to children are accurate. Moreover, for some conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder, there is indisputable neurological evidence. That being said, what follows is a concern with misdiagnosis, which, in so many cases is utterly preventable if we are trauma informed.